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EBBA 36050

Manchester Central Library - Blackletter Ballads
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Good Counsell for young Wooers:
Shewing the Way, the Meanes, and the Skill,
To wooe any Mayden, be she what she will:
Then all young Men that are minded to wooe,
Come heare this new Ballad, and buy't ere you goe.
To a dainty new tune, or else it may be
Sung to the tune of Pretty Bessee.

COme all you young Pupils, that yet have no skill,
In wooing to get a fine Lasses good will,
If you will be ruled, and take my advice,
Ile teach you to wooe, and speed in a trice:
You must not be daunted whatever she say,
[H]e may speed tomorrow, that's cast off today.
If you will wooe a wench with a blacke brow,
Accept of my Counsell, and Ile tell you how:
You must kisse her, and coll her untill she doth yield,
A faint-hearted Souldier will never winne Field.

[Y]ou must set her beauty at the highest rate,
[An]d never leave wooing her early and late.
[Te]ll her that her brow like a black Load-stone drawes
[Th]y Iron heart to her, as Jet will doe strawes:
[Whe]n she doth conceive and perceive thy respect,
[Ere l]ong thy industry shall finde good effect.
[Th]en you that will wooe a wench with a black brow
[Acce]pt, etc.

[For ta]ke this from me, a blacke wench is still proud,
[And lo]ves well to heare her praise set forth aloud,
[Althoug]h she accuse thee of flattery oft
[(And tell] thee she cannot abide to be scoft)
[Yet never] leave praysing her, for if thou dost,
[Thy speec]hes, thy paines, and thy love is all lost.
[Then if] you will wooe a wench with a black brow,
[Accept, etc].

Comply with her humour in ev'rything right,
For that's the chiefe course that can give her delight:
If thou see her merry, then laugh sing and jest,
Or tell some Love tales, this a Mayden likes best,
And when she is sad, then put finger i'th eye,
For Wooers (like women) must oft feign a crye.
Then if you will wooe a wench with a blacke brow,
Accept, etc.

If great be her portion, and thou be but poore,
Thy duety and paines must be so much the more,
Thou must vow good husbandry during thy life,
What will not one promise to get such a wife,
Gownes, Kirtles, and Toyes of the fashion all new,
What though thy words afterwards prove not all true?
Then if you will wooe a wench with a black brow,
Accept, etc.

If thou from her sight have beene too long away,
Then redeeme thy negligence with longer stay,
And if she be angry, be sure goe not thence,
Untill thou force her with thy fault to dispense,
And tell her thou wilt not onely stay all day,
But (if she please) thou wilt her all night obay.
Then if you will wooe a wench with a black brow,
Accept of my counsell, and Ile tell you how,
You must kisse her, and coll her untill she doth yield,
For a faint-hearted souldier will never winne Field.

The second part, To the same tune.

HAve her to weddings, playes, and merry meetings,
Where she may notice take of Lovers greetings,
Such objects oftentimes a motive may be
To make her love thee if she were a Lady:
For when a Mayd sees what's done by another,
It more will perswade then advice from her Mother.
Then if you will wooe a wench with a black brow,
Accept of my counsell, and Ile tell you how:
You must kisse her and coll her untill she doth yield,
For a faint-hearted souldier will never winne Field.

If unto a Fayre thou doe goe farre or nigh,
Although thou have other great matters to buy,
Yet when thou com'st home againe, be not thou sparing,
To say thou went'st onely to buy her a Fayring:
By this she will thinke thou wilt be a kinde wretch,
That wouldst goe so farre off a Fayring to fetch.
Then you, etc.

If she be in presence when others are by,
Where words must be wanting there woo with thy ey,
Although it seeme strange, yet experience doth prove,
That the eye doth convey the first motion of love,
And thou maist perceive by her eye whether she
Doo well correspond in affection with thee.
Then if, etc.

When by these meanes (or by any of them)
Thou hast got this favour of thy precious Gem,
Be carefull to hold and keepe what thou hast got,
The Proverbe sayes strike while the Iron is hot:
For if thou protract, and let slip thy occasion,
Shee's not so soone wonne with a second perswasion.
Then if, etc.

Thou well may'st perceive by the words that are p[ast,]
That I doe advise thee to marry in haste.
A thing may be dasht when it comes to the push,
And one Bird in hand is worth two in the bush.
One day, nay one houre (if thou like thy wife)
May make thee or marre thee all dayes of thy lif[e]
Then if, etc.

Although in my counsell I let others passe,
And onely have mention made of a black Lasse,
Yet be thy Sweet-heart either blacke, browne, or r[uddy]
These Lessons kinde Wooer are fit for thy study:
Be she faire or foule, be she widdow or mayd,
In wooing, a man must doe as I have sayd.
All you that will wooe a wench, etc.

And now with this Counsell my Ditty Ile end,
And if any Carper my skill discommend,
Hee'le shew little wisdome my counsell to blame:
For the wisest wooer may follow the same.
And if they will not, for my part let them chuse[,]
But once more I will them these Lines to peruse[.]
Then if you will wooe a wench with a blacke [brow]
Accept of my counsell, and Ile tell you how[:]
You must kisse her and coll her untill she do[th yield,]
A faint-hearted Souldier will never winne Fi[eld.]


FINIS.
Printed at London for F.G.

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