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EBBA 30220

British Library - Roxburghe
Ballad XSLT Template
A Paire of Turtle Doves, Or,
A dainty new Scotch Dialogue between a Yong-man and
his Mistresse, both correspondent in affection, etc.
To a pretty pleasant tune, called the absence of my Mistresse, or
I live not where I love.

Yong-man.
MUst the absence of my Mistresse
gar me be thus discontent,
As thus to leave me in distresse,
and with languor to lament:
Nothing earthly shall divorce me
from my deerest, but disdaine,
Nor no fortune shall enforce me,
from my fairest to refraine.
O my deerest,
My heart neerest:
When shall I so happy bee
To embrace thee,
And to place thee,
Where thou nere maist part from me.

Maide.
Since my absence doth so greeve thee,
it doth wound me to the heart:
If my presence could releeve thee,
I would play a loyall part:
But I prethee be contented,
sith the Fates will have it so,
Though our meeting be prevented,
thou my constancy shalt know.
O my sweetest,
The compleatest
Man alive in my conceite,
Lady Fortune
Ile importune,
Soone to make our Joyes compleate.

Yong-man.
Since thy absence doth conjure me
with perplexity and paine,
What would thy presence then allure me,
for to see thee once againe:
As thy absence sends such sadnesse
that it scarcely can be told:
So thy presence yeeldeth gladnesse,
to all eyes that thee behold.
O my deerest, etc.

Maide.
What reward then shall I render,
to him that me doth so respect,
But my constancy to tender,
With like favour to affect:
And since thy love to me is fervent,
so my heart shall be to thee,
And as thou provst my loyall servant,
thy true Mistresse I will be,
O my sweetest,
The compleatest
Man alive in my conceite,
Lady Fortune
Ile importune,
Soone to make our Joyes complate.

Yong-man.
Then my Love, my Dove, my fairest,
sith I may repose such trust,
In my heart thou only sharest,
none else crave a portion must:
Thou hast setled thy affection
upon me and none beside,
And I of thee have made election,
thou alone shalt be my Bride.
Come my deerest,
My heart neerest,
When shall I so happy bee,
To embrace thee,
And to place thee,
Where thou nere maist part from me.

Maide.
My hearts Joy, more sweet than honey,
or the odoriferous rose,
I have laid such hold upon thee,
as the world can nere unlose
The Gordian knot, which though as yet
is not by Hymen tyed fast,
Yet Heaven knowes my heart is set
on thee my choice, while breath doth last.
Come my sweetest, etc.

The second part To the same tune.

Young-man.
When Hyperion doth for ever
from the Skye obscure his rayes,
When bright Luna (constant never)
leaves to sever nights from dayes:
When the Sea doth cease from running,
when all thus change preposterously,
Then that firme vow which I once made,
(and not till then) Ile breake with thee.
Come my deerest,
My heart neerest,
When shall I so happy be,
To embrace thee,
And to place thee,
Where thou nere maist part from me.

Maide.
When rich mizers throw their mony
in the streetes, and hoord up stones,
When my Fathers Nagge so bonny,
leaves good hay to picke dry bones:
And when the dogge conforme to that,
doth change his food for Oates and hay,
Then shall my oath be out of date,
or else last till my dying day.
Come my sweetest,
The compleatest
Man alive in my conceite,
Lady Fortune,
Ile importune,
Soone to make our joyes compleate.

Young-man.
When the Bucke, the Hare, or Cony
doe pursue the Dogge to death,
When a rocke so hard and stony,
can dissolvd be with mans breath:
When turtles make a second chusing,
then will I a new Love seeke,

Till then all but thee refusing,
though I might change every weeke.
Come my deerest, etc.

Maide.
When both toads, with snakes and adders,
breed upon the Irish ground,
When men scale the Skie with Ladders,
when two Phoenixes are found:
When the Goose the Fox doth follow,
or seeke to hunt him forth his den,
Or swine in dirt refuse to wallow,
Ile not forsake my love till then.
Come my sweetest, etc.

Young-man.
Then sweet Love sith both agree thus,
having hearts reciprocall,
Long I hope we shall not be thus
barred from the principall
Of all our joy, which is blest marriage,
Hymen haste to knit the knot,
Ith meane time our constant carriage,
will ith world nere be forgot.
Come my deerest,
My heart neerest,
When shall I so happy be,
To embrace thee
And to place thee,
Where thou nere maist part from me.


FINIS. Martin Parker.
Printed at London for Thomas Lam-
bert, at the signe of the Hors-
shooe in Smithfield.

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