EBBA 36494

British Library - Book of Fortune
 
The Roaring Black-Smiths Resoution; / OR, / A merry Ditty compos'd on purpose to make you laugh. / There was a Black-smith liv'd in Cambridge-sheire, / As I lately for certaine truth did heare: / That had great meanes indeed but wasted all, / And then to Poverty he straight did fall, / His Passages in verse I here have writ / Hoping thereby that some will learne more wit, / He doth recant at last and bids adieu / To all his boone companions old and new.
Date Published 1640-1674 ?
Author Thomas Jordan
Standard Tune
Imprint London, Printed for Richard Burton in Smithfield
License
Collection British Library - Book of Fortune
Location British Library
Shelfmark C.20.f.14.(18.)
ESTC ID
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    Additional Information
     Part 1Part 2
    TitleThe Roaring Black-Smiths Resoution; / OR, / A merry Ditty compos'd on purpose to make you laugh. / There was a Black-smith liv'd in Cambridge-sheire, / As I lately for certaine truth did heare: / That had great meanes indeed but wasted all, / And then to Poverty he straight did fall, / His Passages in verse I here have writ / Hoping thereby that some will learne more wit, / He doth recant at last and bids adieu / To all his boone companions old and new.The second part,
    Tune ImprintTo a Pleasant new Tune, call'd Farwell to St. Gilesesto the same tune.
    First LinesTHe prettiest Jest that ere I heard / to you I will declare,AT last the oyle of Barley / did worke so gallantly,
    RefrainLet's drinke and rant, / And sing a merry straine, / And when the Flaggons out then fill it again [with variation]Then they left off their ranting / I tell you very plaine / The Flaggon it was out but was not fild again | The Tapster then was sick / In every vaine, / Because he fild his Beere, and had nothing for his pain [with variation] | Oh now my heart, / Is full of griefe and paine, / Give me my money & take your drink again [with variation]
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    Notes ESTC Author: Thomas Jordan