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EBBA 35213

Houghton Library - Huth EBB65H
Ballad XSLT Template
The Ladies Delight:
OR,
Narcissus his Love-Flower.
A pleasant and delightful new Ditty,
Made by a Lover, for Ladies so Witty;
When to Venus Sports they please to resort,
To pull sweet Flowers, that yields the best sport.
To the Tune of, Narcissus come kisse us, etc.
1

C

AS I was walking I cannot tell when,
nor I cannot tell whither,
I met with a crew of I cannot tell who,
nor cannot tell what they were:
But Virgins I think; for they cry'd
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside.

They sang a fine Song of I cannot tell what,
nor whether in Verse or in Prose:
Nor knew I their meaning although they all sate
even as it were under my Nose:
But ever and anon they all cry'd,
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside:

There came in a Lad from I cannot tell whence,
with I cannot tell what in his hand;
It was a live thing that had little sence,
but yet it could lustily stand:
Then lowder these Ladies they cry'd,
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside.

Some shak'd it, some stroak'd it, some kist it, 'tis said,
it looked so lovely indeed;
All hug'd it as honey, and none were afraid,
because of their bodily need:
And lowder these Ladies they cry'd,
Narcissus come kiss us, and love us beside.

The second Part, to the same Tune

AT length he did put in this pretty fine top
in I cannot tell where below,
Into one of these Ladies; but I cannot tell why,
nor wherefore it should be so:
But in the meantime they cry'd,
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside.

But when that these Ladies had sported all night
and rifled Dame Natures store,
And raised themselves in Venus delight,
that they could hardly do more:
Yet lowder these Ladies they cry'd,
Narcissus come kisse us, and us beside.

This Lad being tired, began to retreat,
and hang down his head like a flower;
The Ladies the more did desire the feat,
but alas 'twas out of his Power:
Then lowder and lowder they cry'd,
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside,

When full forty weeks were almost expir'd,
a pittiful story to tell,
These Ladies did hate what most they desir'd,
their Bellies began for to swell:
Then with a woful Tune they all cry'd
Narcissus won't kisse us, nor love us beside.

Lucina in pitty then lent them her aid,
to ease them of their sorrow;
But when that these Ladies were gently laid,
they had the same mind tomorrow:
And dandling their Bantlings they cry'd,
Narcissus shan't kisse us, and lye by our side.

But as I was minding these pretty fine toys,
how Venus with Cupid did play;
What pleasure those Ladies did take in their boys,
did lead my fancy astray;
To hear how they lull'd them, and cry'd,
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside.

I then return'd, I cannot tell how,
nor what was in my mind;
Nor what else I heard, I know not I vow,
nor saw, for Cupid is blind:
But that these Ladies still cry'd
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside,

But now to conclude, I cannot tell what,
nor when, nor how nor where;
Nor found I the Sense of their Song or their Chat,
for Ladies are fickle as Air:
Therefore I did laugh till they cry'd,
Narcissus come kisse us, and love us beside.


London, Printed for W. Thackeray, T. Passenger, and W. Whitwood.

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