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EBBA 35123

Houghton Library - Huth EBB65H
Ballad XSLT Template
The Dorset-shire Lovers:
OR, THE
Honest innocent Wooing between John the Farmer and
his Sweet-heart Joan, as they happen'd to meet one Morning
in the midst of a green Meadow.
To the Tune of, The Scotch H[a]y-makers.
Licens'd according to Order.

PAssing through a Meadow, young John did Joany meet,
Like the youthful Queen of May in her Summer's Robes compleat,
With a Congue to the ground, he reply'd, Since I have found
So fit a season, 'tis but reason our Comforts should be crown'd,
Long I have lov'd thee I must confess.
But ne'r could find a time, Love, my kindness to express,
For sure it is well known, my Heart is thine alone,
I'll never, never, sever, sever from my loving Joan.

John I fear you flatter as many more has done,
For young Batchelors we see after many Damsels run,
I by true experience find, that they waver with the Wind,
New change of Faces and Embraces pleases best their Mind,
Therefore I pray you now let me go;
But Johnny he reply'd, I will never serve thee so,
For sure it is well known, my Heart is thine alone,
I'll never, never, sever, sever from my loving Joan.

Love thou shalt be Marry'd, and be a vertuous Bride,
And I'll give thee Gloves and Rings with twenty things beside,
For the pleasures of the night, shall my dearest Love delight,
Then sit down by me, don't deny me, for thy Beauty bright

I do admire and ever shall,
Till now I ne'r beheld one so proper, straight and tall,
Since we are here al[o]ne, the truth I will make known,
I'll never, never, sever, sever from my loving Joan.

If you will believe me, in troth, I am too young,
Therefore tempt me now no more with your deluding Tongue;
O your kissing, John, forbear, least you draw me in a snare,
Your talk of Weding and of Beding makes me blush, I swear,
What if my Mother should chance to know,
That in the silent Mead I was kiss'd and courted so?
Quoth Johnny, It is all one, to her I'd make it known,
I'll never, never, sever, sever from my loving Joan.

John, why will you Marry now while the Times are hard,
Should we be poor and needy, pray, whom will us regard?
We must think upon that state, now before it is too late,
For should we Marry, and Miscarry, then will our Grief be great,
Therefore I'd have you yet longer stay;
But Johnny he reply'd, He wou'd Wed without delay,
Quoth he, It is well known, my Heart is thine alone,
I'll never, never, sever, sever from my loving Joan.

Never fear to venture, or in the least be sad,
For my Gransir dy'd of late and left me all he had,
There's a Farm, which now I keep, with a herd and flock of Sheep,
With other Treasure out of measure, thou shalt Comforts reap,
For I'll maintain thee gallant and gay,
Therefore, my Dearest, now let's appoint our Wedding-day,
To joyn our Hearts in one, for thou art mine alone,
I'll never, never, sever, sever from my loving Joan.

Thou shalt mind the Dairy, and I the happy Farm,
I will keep thee Men and Maids, I hope that is no harm,
Thou shalt feed on roast and bo[i]l'd, and I'll get my Dear with Child,
Which will be Pleasure out of measure. Joan at this she smil'd,
For she delighted in living well,
Therefore, said she, Sweet John, now the naked truth to tell,
If you'll be mine alone, and joyn our Hearts in one,
I'll never, never, sever, sever, but be thy sweet Joan.

There is none I honour above my true Love John,
On my Conscience, thou wilt prove a right honest Man;
We'll be Marry'd, let me see, about Thursday next, that we
Without delaying, foolish staying never pleases me,
Now I admire the charming Bliss;
Then Johnny he reply'd, with a tender loving kiss,
thee I love alone, our Hearts we'll joyn in one,
And never, never, sever, sever from my loving Joan.


London: Printed for P. Brooksby, at the Golden-ball, in Pye-corner.

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