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EBBA 31878

University of Glasgow Library - Euing
Ballad XSLT Template
Phillis forsaken,
In Pursuit of CORIDON.
Behold fair Phillis by her Love forsaken
In search of him that will not be ore taken,
Whilst she (poor soul) her cheeks with tears bedewing,
Romes over hills and dales in vain pursuing.
Twould melt a marble heart, her sad complaining
Whilst he seems deaf, her Love and she disdaining.
To the Tune of, Daphnaes Complaint, or O my Love, etc.

AS I went abroad to play
In a morning fresh and gay,
Hearing the sweet Nightingale
Tell her sad and dolefull tale.
Strait I heard a voice to cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
pitty me or else I dye.

At the first I was amazd
And with greedy eyes I gazd,
Till at length I saw where stood
Phillis in a pensive mood.
Mournfully she thus did cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

Turn O turn sweet Coridon
Do not thus thy Phillis wrong,
Hearken to my woful plaint,
Now with sorrow I am faint,
Whilst I strain my voice to cry.
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

Tell me dearest tell me plain
Why thou dost my Love disdain,
Wherein have I done amiss
That I am debard of bliss.
Listen to my woful cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly
Pitty me or else I dye.

O Hard hearted Shepherd turn
Let not Phillis longer mourn,
See her tender bodys torn
With the bramble and the thorn,
Hearken to my mournful Song,
O my Love, O my Love.
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

Why art thou more cruel far
Then the Tyger and the Bear,
Do not bear so fierce a mind
As the wild beasts in their kind,
Hearken to my dolefull cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

Each green fields and shady Grove
Bear you witness of my love,
And the little Lambs which play
In the flowry field so gay,
Hear me whilst with grief I cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

All you pretty birds that sings
And you Christal streaming springs
That do murmure as you glide
By the pleasant Meadows side,
Bear a part when I do cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

Pan thou god of Shepherd Swains
Viewing these Arcadian plains,
Cast an eye upon my grief
Coridon hath plaid the thlef.
Pitty me when I do cry
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Turn again or else I dye.

Venus with thy naked boy
After sorrow send me joy,
Stop my Lover in his Race
And bring him to me face to face,
That he once may hear me c[r]y,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why didst thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

You fair Nymphs that sport and play
And Dianas laws obey,
Did you not meet my Coridon
Tell me which way he is gone,
That I once may cease to cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why dost thou fly,
Pitty me or else I dye.

Thus fair Phillis did complain
On the pleasant flowry plain,
Till at last her Lover came
For to ease her of her pain.
Then she thus began to cry,
O my Love, O my Love,
O my Love why didst thou flye.
Ease me of my misery.


Printed for W. Whitwood at the Golden Lion in Duck Lane.

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