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EBBA 30943

British Library - Roxburghe
Ballad XSLT Template
News for Youngmen and Maids.
Who now may weep, their joy is fled,
For Love is dead and buried.
To a curious New Tune.

FRom Fairy Land I hear it is reported
That love is dead and in his grave laid,
And she that hath been often times courted,
Shall for her coyness now dye a Maid;
Now Bess, and Nell, with Susan, and Mary,
In hope of Suiters long may tarry.
For Love is dead and buried,
And with him all true joyes are fled.

Young-men and maids shall not go a walking
As in the former time they have done,
Nor yet in shady Bowers sit a talking,
For Venus now hath lost her Son,
And she that fifteen years hath known,
Shall now in corners weep alone.
For Love is dead and buried,
And with him all true joy is fled.

No courtly Language shall now be used,
[P]lain-dealing shall be counted a Jewell,

And she that hath her Suiter refusd,
Shall wish she had not provd so cruel,
And she that hath the time delayd,
Must be content to dye a Maid.
For with him love is dead and buried,
And with him all true joy is fled.

The Sheapherds that do sit on the Mountains
Will all be sorry this News for to hear;
The Nymphs that do resort to the Fountains,
When they do know it, will shed a tear,
For they shall now no Garlands make
Of flowers for their Lovers sake.
For Love is dead and buried,
And with him all true joy is fled.

The country Lads that were full of kindness
To give their Lasses what they did require,
Shall wonder greatly at their own blindness
And leave of all their former desire;

THey shall not take them out to dance,
Nor yet in Songs their praise advance
For Love is dead and buried,
And with him all true Love is fled.

All Creatures shall express their own sorrow
The Birds shall drop away with grief,
The Pellican, mans tears shall borrow,
In hope thereby to find some relief,
The Turtle Dove shall lose her Mate,
And pine away disconsolate.
For Love is dead and buried,
And with him all true joy is fled.

Young men shall now repent their expences,
Which they on Maids did use to bestow
Who in like manner did seek fair pretences,
That with their sweethearts abroad might go
But those same days are past and gone,
And Maidens now shall stay at home.
For Love is dead and buried,
And with him all true Love is fled.

All the whole World hath cause to be grived,
For this same News which I do relate,
Which I do think may well be believd,
Since Love you see is grown out of date,
And Mistress Money his place doth take,
While she her self doth matches make.
For Love is dead, etc.

For Mistress Money is grown to such credit,
That she doth rule all things here below,
And who can marry if she do forbid it?
Since wealth is most esteemed you know;
The Mother now will sell her daughter,
Although she do repent hereafter.
For Love is dead, etc.

For if a Maid her fancy have placed,
By the direction of her own own will,
Yet is her purpose always defaced,
By those who seek to cross her love still,
And she at last is bought and sold,
For lucre of some wealth or Gold,
For Love is dead, etc.

In ancient times they often did marry,
For love which then was most highly prized;
But now alass, long time they may tarry
If that some other way be not devised,
For Portions now do bear the sway,
And will do more still every day.
For Love is dead, etc.

Well fare those dayes when shepheards de-lighted,
With the young Nymphs to dance on a green,
Where all their love was kindly requited,
In such due manner as might them be seem,
But these same days will nere come again,
When Shepheards live thus on the Plain.
For Love is dead, etc.

Good Qualities now and vertuous carriage,
Is nothing without Money beside,
Nor did I ever yet see a Marriage,
Wherein a true Lovers knot was tide:
For they no sooner Married once be,
But both of them do disagree.
For Love is dead, etc.

For when to marry they have been enforced,
What can ensue but strife and debate:
And then they seek how to be Divorced
And wish to be in their former state,
But those which marry thus I dare say,
Shall nere know contented day.
For Love is dead, etc.

Therefore let all young Maidens take warn-ing,
How they do grant their Love unto any,
Or be allured with their sweet charming,
By which they have deceived so many,
For all this year I do foresee,
That Weddings shall unhappy be.
For Love is dead, etc.

Now to conclude and shut up my Ditty,
This news I know most strange will appear,
Both in the Country and in the City,
For yet the like they never did hear,
The Country Lasses I do believe,
When they hear this news they will grieve.
For Love is dead and buried,
And with him all true joyes are fled.


London, Printed for W. Thacery, and W. Whitwood.

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