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EBBA 30354

British Library - Roxburghe
Ballad XSLT Template
The Wooing Lasse, and the Way-ward Lad,
Who long had made his Sweet-heart sad,
Because to her hee would not yeeld,
Till Cupid him to Love compeld.
To the tune of The Nightingale.

UPon a Holy day,
When the Nimphs had leave to play,
I sate unseene
In a Meddow greene,
where I heard a Lasse in an angry spleene,
Perswading of a Swaine
To leave his drudging vaine,
and sport with her upon the Plaine.
But the silly Clowne,
Did sadly sit him downe:
And regardlesse of her mone,
He left her all alone.
then shee cryd,
Come away bony Boy,
Come away;
I cannot come,
I will not come,
I dare not come,
My workes not done,
and this was all the Clowne would say.

Quoth shee thou gentle Swaine,
Doe not my love disdaine,
Thou shouldst woe me,
Now I woe thee,
let not thy heart so froward bee,
But yeeld to my request,
In troth I doe not jest,
tis thee alone that I love best.
Yet the simple Asse,
Respected not the Lasse,
Hard hearted that he was
With her he would not passe,
though shee cryd
Come away bony Boy, etc.

I prethee Sweet (she said)
Regard a Love-sicke Maide,
Tis thee alone
Must ease my mone,
or else I comfort can get none
O be not so obdure,
O sit not so demure,
let me thy love (with prayrs) procure.
But all in vaine
She wood the surly Swaine,
For she could not obtaine,
His love that shee would faine,
though shee cryd
Come away bony Boy, etc.

Yet still the loving Girle
Besought the clownish Churle,
And wood him still,
For his good will,
but her successe was alwaies ill,
For all that painefull while,
She could not see him smile,
her troubled thoughts to reconcile.
The home-bred Lad,
For skill in loving had,
He gave her answers bad,
Which made her very sad:
yet she cryd
Come away bony Boy,
Come away;
I cannot come,
I will not come,
I dare not come,
My workes not done,
And this was all the Clowne would say.

The second part, To the same tune.

YEt sheed not be answerd so,
Nor from him would she goe,
So soone away,
But shee still made stay,
to heare more what the Swaine would say.
O courteous Lad she said,
Reflect upon a Maid,
and let me thee to love perswade:
But all this winde
No comfort yet could finde
Herein him to her minde,
For still he was unkinde,
though she cryd,
Come away bony Boy,
Come away;:
I cannot come,
I will not come,
I dare not come,
My workes not done,
and this was all the Clowne would say.

Just as the Paphean Queene,
Adonis urgd to spleene,
As he was coy,
even so this Boy
could not be woon to kisse and toy.
Though humbly there besought,
It no compassion wrought,
for he to love would not be taught.
On him she hung,
From her away he flung,
He bade her hold her tongue,
For he would not goe along,
yet she cryd,
Come away bony Boy, etc.

As Salmacis (so bright)
Did woo young Aphrodite,
But all in vaine,
So she this Swaine,
and could not her request obtaine,
For he was obstinate,
And bade her leave her prate,
thus for her love she purchaste hate.
Love was so strong,
In this bonny Lasse so young,
That she could not hold her tongue,
Though he had denyd so long:
yet shee cryd,
Come away bonny Boy, etc.

This Maid was grieved sore,
Great cause she had therefore,
Sith twas her fate,

To love for hate,
which she could not anticipate.
Such force young Cupid hath,
Ore them that tread his path,
the Lad regards not what she saith.
He doth persist,
Still to resist,
To her he will not list,
But bids her to be whist,
though shee cryd,
Come away bonny Boy, etc.

The Maid was grievd in minde,
That the Lad was so unkinde:
Then to Venus she went,
Sore discontent,
who chargd her Boy with his Bow ready bent,
To take a nimble Dart,
And pierce him to the heart,
because he did her precept thwart.
Cupid strong,
Gave the Lad such a bang,
That he forcd him to gang,
With his bonny Lasse along,
when shee cryd,
Come away bonny Boy,
Come thou hither;
I come, I come,
I run, I run,
Now I am won,
All shall be done,
And so they went along together.

By this we well may prove,
The wonderous power of Love.
For this young Boy,
Before so coy,
now calls the Maid his onely Joy.
He tooke her by the waste,
And kindly her embract,
he payes her love with kisses chaste.
He grieves in minde,
That before was unkinde,
He tells her she shall finde,
That the best shall come behind,
and indeed,
They with speed were agreed
Each with other:
With joynt consent,
And hearts content,
To Church they went,
Incontinent,
and there they marryd were together.


Printed at London for J. Wright junior, dwelling at the upper end of the Old Baily.
FINIS.
M.P.

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