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EBBA 30132

British Library - Roxburghe
Ballad XSLT Template
A Lovers teares:
OR,
The constancy of a yong mans mind,
Although his choyce be too unkind.
All you yong men who heare this Ditty,
A Lovers teares bemoane with pitty.
To the tune of Sigh, sob, and weepe.

YOu who have run in Cupids maze,
and on fond beauties vainly gaze,
Attend while I explaine my moane,
and think my case may be your owne,
Then learne to pitty Lovers teares,
for love is full of cares and feares.

The bitter sweets that I did taste,
and borrowed hours consumd in wast,
Makes me my friends with counsell arme
that they in time may shun like harm.
And learne etc.

A curious beauty I adore,
and must though she hate me therefore,
For now I am within the net,
at liberty I cannot get.
Then learne etc.

Ill hap had I to see her face,
unlesse her heart would yeeld me grace:
Her eyes had such attractive force,
I needs must love without remorse.
Then learne, etc.

Her haires were Cupids chains to tie
me unto her perpetually,
For I must love her, tis my fate,
and be repaid with mortall hate.
Then learne to pitty Lovers teares,
for love is full of cares and feares.

I thinke on her both night and morne,
which when she hears, she saies in scorn
If you be foolish, sir, must I
be bound your mind to satisfie?
And thus my sad complaints she jeeres,
for love is full of cares and feares.

She thinks her selfe too high in bloud,
and for to match with me too good,
Fond foole sayes she; art so unwise,
to thinke that Eagles strike at flyes?
O yong men pitty Lovers teares,
for love is full of cares and feares.

Such unequality she makes,
no pitty on my moane she takes,
The more I weepe, the more doth she,
insult over my misery.
O yong men, etc.

If I to her a letter frame,
she saith she hates to reade my name,
And therefore to prevent that paine,
in scorne she sends it back againe:
Then learne etc.

If I doe meet with her by chance,
my captivd heart (for joy) doth dance,
But to suppresse that joy again,
she turnes her face with coy disdaine.
Then yong men, etc.

The second part To the same tune.

SHe shuns my presence with hast,
then ere one word from me is past,
Shees out of sight or out of call,
and will not heare me speake at all.
O yong men pitty Lovers teares,
for love is full of cares and feares.

Sometimes unto her maid I speake,
and she my mind to her doth breake,
Away thou silly foole quoth she,
hees hardly good enough for thee.
O yong men, etc.

Thus she doth strive to vilifie
my name with hatefull infamy,
O note the haughty insolence
of maids in fortunes eminence.
And learne, etc.

Wert not a shame it should be said
I wood the Mistresse, yet the maid
I am esteemd scarce worthy of,
what man could beare so foule a scoffe?
Yet I with patience take these jeeres,
for love is full of cares and feares.

I would my fancy could disswade
me from the Mistresse to the maid,
But o alasse that may not be,
if ere I marry t must be she.
O yong men, etc.

I wish I could my heart reclaime,
from doting on this scornfull dame,

For all my sighs and all my care
are like to arrows shot ith aire.
O yong men etc.

Suppose she be in her degree,
(as she pretends) too good for me,
In love the begger and the King,
coequally doe feele the sting.
O yong men etc.

It is her proud fastidious thought,
that only hath this difference wrought
For in a true impartiall eye,
theres no great odds twixt her and I,
O yong men etc.

Well, if I die as needs I must,
Cupid grant me one boone thats just,
That ere she wed she may be faine
a worse then I to entertaine.
O yong men etc.

And so farewell thou cruell faire,
come gentle death and end my care,
Kind yongmen learne by my behest,
to love your enemies thats the best.
And learne to pitty Lovers teares,
for love is full of cares and feares.


M.P.
FINIS.
Printed at London for Tho: Lambert, at
the sign of the Hors-shoo in Smithfield.

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