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EBBA 20150

Magdalene College - Pepys
Ballad XSLT Template
This Maide would give tenne
Shillings for a Kisse: To the Tune of Shall I wrastle in despaire.

YOu young men all take pitty on me,
the haplessest Maid you ever did see:
Refus'd of all, of all neglected,
hated of all and by none affected:
The cause I know not: well I know,
their fond neglect procures my woe.
Then since their hopefull loves I misse,
come, here's ten shillings for a kisse.

I doe as much as a Maide can doe,
for gainst my nature I doe woe:
I use all meanes that ere I can,
to get the love of a proper man:
Yet let me use the best of skill,
they still deny, and crosse my will:
Then since their hopefull loves I misse:
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

With Sievet sweet I make me fine,
with sweet complection I doe shine:
With beautious colours passing deere,
I paint and prune, yet nere the neere.
My cost is vaine, so well it proves:
for all my cost there's no man loves:
Then since their hopefull loves I misse,
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

I have a face as fayre as any,
my nose and lip surpasseth many,
I have an eye that rowsing lies,
though theies are better to intice:
Why should all men disdaining prove?
and worser beauties dearely love?
But since their hopefull loves I misse:
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

My armes are nimble to each poynt,
active I am in every joynt:
I am not as some maidens are,
so coy, for young men not to care,
Why should I then disdained be?
when those are lov'd be worse then me:
But since their hopefull loves I misse:
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

My waste is small, and likewise long,
my leg well calfe, and boned strong,
My pretty foote you all may feele,
is not in bredth an inch in th' heele.
From head to foote in every part,
I seeme a building fram'd by Art:
Yet since their hopefull loves I misse,
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

Yet man's obdurate to my mones,
they all stand senslesse of my grones,
They nere regard a proper maide:
great heyres are tane and she denaid,
Yet by all meanes I will assay,
to gaine mens loves as well as they:
For since their hopefull loves I misse,
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

Is Cupid dead, will he not strike,
and make some man perforce to like:
Or is he angry with a creature,
making me live the scorne of nature:
Or is his dart in's Quiver fast:
oh no, I h[op]e heele strike at last:
Since I their hopefull loves do misse,
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

To the Dauncing schoole I usuall goe,
and learne farre more then many doe
Oft I resort to weddings for this,
onely to gayne a young mans kisse.
Yet though my dauncing be so good,
by all youth there I am withstood:
Then since their hopefull loves I misse,
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

Let Venus guide some young mans hart,
or Anthropos strike here thy Dart
Let young men pitty my hard state,
or prove like me unfortunate.
Come gentle young men ease my griefe,
nought but a kisse can give reliefe,
For since their hopefull loves I misse:
come here's ten shillings for a kisse.

FIINS.
Printed at London by J. White.
The Second Part sheweth shee may have them
Cheape I wis: To the Tune I can nor will no longer lye alone.

ALack fayre Maide, why dost thou grone,
As it for a kisse, alack but for one?
Nay thou shalt have a hundred one two or three,
More sweeter then the hunny that comes from the Bee.

Doe not thinke we men are unkind,
For a Kisse or two to stay behinde:
Nay thou shalt have a hundred one two or three,
More sweter then the blossomes from the Tree.

All Maydes they say, not as you say,
For if that we pray, they will say nay:
The more that we seeke they still will reply,
Alack they cannot love, yet know not why.

I doe not condem all of your kind,
But such that beare a froward faithles minde:
The good I doe protest, I love with my heart,
And with the evill I, will not take part.

Wee men are constant and Women to blame
To be unconstant, to their loves a shame:
Yet tell them of their faults, they still will reply,
They will have their wiles, yet know not why.

I would all Maides were of thy minde,
Then should we Men to woemen be kinde:
And in love and Amitie agree,
More sweter uhen the hunny that comes from the Bee.

Many examples I could procure,
Shewing men constant in their love:
Which thou shalt finde in mee I tell thee plaine,
Come kisse me gentle Sweeting O Kisse againe.

There dwels a Mayd in our Towne greene,
With whome many Lovers, I have seene:
Yet shee's so coy, God wot she will have none,
But lead a single life all alone.

But how it falles I doe not know,
A Ballet they say, now doth it show:
That sighing and protesting, she makes her mone,
She can nor will no longer lye alone.

An other lately as I heare,
That vow'd to live a Mayden forty yeere:
Five shillings for a Husband now doth cry,
If that she be not holpen, alack shee'l die.

Come Ginny come an other cryes,
With the trickling teares in her eyes:
My Mayden head alacke it troubles me,
O Ginny Ginny I, may say to thee.

Doe not blush at this I speake,
For alacke I know your Sex is weake:
Let coy Dames passe away, refusing their blisse,
Upon thy sweet lipes I doe seale this Kisse.

And now to conclud this my Songe.
Alacke for a Kisse thou hast stayd too long:
Nay thou deserv'st a thousand one two or three,
More sweeter then the blossomes of the Tree.


FINIS.
Printed at London by J. White.

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